Weatherization Assistance Program for Low-Income Persons – Most homes have air leaks. One of the easiest and quickest ways to cut energy waste in your home is to seal those leaks. In fact, about one-third of the air that moves through your home enters or exits through cracks in ceilings, walls, floors and the foundation. In your energy savers booklet, we see a chart demonstrating where air enters or exists from your home. Notice that your floors, walls, and ceiling account for 31% of air loss while air ducts make up about 15%. Gaps around doors and windows make up around 21% and gaps around plumbing are responsible for about 13% of home air loss.Now let’s start finding those air leaks by inspecting your home. To begin, close all your doors and windows, then turn on your dryer or a vent fan. This will create a partial vacuum in the house and cause outside air to come in

Now let’s start finding those air leaks by inspecting your home. To begin, close all your doors and windows, then turn on your dryer or a vent fan. This will create a partial vacuum in the house and cause outside air to come in any way it can. Professionals may use smoke pencils or puffers to find air leaks, however, you can use the back of your hand to test around doors, windows, attic hatches, crawlspace entries and any place plumbing and utilities enter the home. If you think an area may have a leak, check it out. You’ll be able to feel air moving in.

In addition, you can test door and window gaps with a small piece of paper. Close the door or window on the paper and see if it pulls out easily. If it does, you may have a gap that needs weatherstripping. For a more thorough examination of your home, you can have a professional look for leaks as part of an energy audit. Ask your utility company, local services agencies or community action agency programs if inspection services are available and how much they cost or if you rent, talk to your landlord about air leakage.Now that we’ve seen where the problem areas are, let’s look at how to fix them. We’ll look at three ways to seal leaks and reduce heat loss. Caulking, weatherstripping and insulating.

Now that we’ve seen where the problem areas are, let’s look at how to fix them. We’ll look at three ways to seal leaks and reduce heat loss. Caulking, weather stripping and insulating.

We’ve been talking about weatherization. Now we’ll look at one specific type of weatherization, caulking.

Caulk is used to seal holes and cracks in your home. There are many different types of caulk, so be sure to read the label and use the right product for your project. The most common way to buy caulk is in tubes like these, which are used in caulking guns. But you can also buy caulk in rope form, in spray cans, and in squeeze tubes.Once you have what you need, you can start filling in any leaks you found during your inspection. If you rent, talk to your landlord before doing any caulking or weatherstripping.

Once you have what you need, you can start filling in any leaks you found during your inspection. If you rent, talk to your landlord before doing any caulking or weatherstripping.
To apply caulk from a tube, place it in a caulk gun. Cut off the tip. Pierce the tube seal, and squeeze the trigger a few times to lay down a long consistent strip. Then smooth it with a plastic spoon or your finger to fill the gap entirely and seal edges. If any crack is wider than about a fourth of an inch, use rope caulk, Backer Rod, or some other good fill material to plug it first. Then use regular caulk to fill in any remaining gaps.If you have any cracks or gaps around your door and window frames, be sure to fill them in, both on the inside and the outside. Be sure not to caulk your windows or doors shut or caulk the weep holes shut.

If you have any cracks or gaps around your door and window frames, be sure to fill them in, both on the inside and the outside. Be sure not to caulk your windows or doors shut or caulk the weep holes shut.Look around your home’s foundation, and fill in any cracks you see there, too. Also, caulk around all pipes, vents, and other openings, but be sure not to seal or block any air intakes or exhaust vents. Remember that most homes need a place to bring in

Look around your home’s foundation, and fill in any cracks you see there, too. Also, caulk around all pipes, vents, and other openings, but be sure not to seal or block any air intakes or exhaust vents. Remember that most homes need a place to bring in fresh air and get rid of dangerous gasses, pollutants, and moisture.

As you caulk, be aware that blocking air intakes or exhaust vents can be dangerous, so be sure you don’t do anything to keep them from working properly. Also, if you’re caulking around a pipe or chimney, use caulk made for high temperatures.

Inside your home, caulk any cracks that may leak air into the attic or garage. If you need to, use an expanding foam to fill in large cavities. With these types of foam, it’s a good idea to look for one that doesn’t expand very much. Some high expansion foams can actually expand so much that they stop windows or doors from opening properly. Be sure to read the label before you buy or use these products.

Now that we’ve seen how to seal up some common household leaks, let’s move on to weatherstripping.

Doors and windows have moving parts that need to open and close freely. Unfortunately, this means they also have natural gaps, which let air escape from your home. To keep your windows and doors sealed as tightly as possible, it’s important to use weatherstripping.Chances are you probably already have

Chances are you probably already have to weatherstrip throughout your house, but it may be damaged or worn. Over time, these products can become less and less effective, so it’s important to check them once each year. If you can feel air coming in around your doors, windows, or attic hatch, your weatherstripping needs to be replaced. Fortunately, most types are easy to install, either with sticky adhesive, or with nails, screws, or pre-punched holes. Be sure you buy the right kind and size of weatherstripping for the job, and as you work, read and follow the manufacturer’s directions carefully.

If you rent and aren’t able to permanently fix leaky windows and doors, you can use flexible foam Backer Rod, and wedge it into the cracks. If you move, you can even take it with you.
After you’ve sealed your doors and windows, you may want to do the same thing to the electrical light switches and outlets on your exterior walls. Insulated foam gaskets are available to fit between the cover plate and the switch or outlet.First go to your home’s electrical panel, and shut off the electricity to the area. Next unscrew the cover plate, and put the gasket over the switch or outlet. When you’re finished, screw the cover plate back on, and turn on the electricity.

First go to your home’s electrical panel, and shut off the electricity to the area. Next unscrew the cover plate, and put the gasket over the switch or outlet. When you’re finished, screw the cover plate back on, and turn on the electricity.

Weatherization Assistance Program for Low-Income Persons